“It makes kids do really cool stuff”: Northern Ontario Catholic School Boards on Technology in the Classroom

KCDSBFrom docking a spacecraft to building an M-bot to designing a stop-motion picture production, students across two Catholic school boards in Northern Ontario have taken technology to an entirely new level – and it’s because of their teachers’ belief in what’s to come.

Northwest Catholic District School Board and the Kenora Catholic District School Board recently teamed up to launch a video showcasing a collaborative project called The Impact of Learning Technologies.


The project studied the impact of technology on student learning over an eight-month period.


The video included interviews with both students and faculty. As the students showcase their finished projects, they share their insights on the process and creating projects that integrate technology. It’s clear the students are sold on it.

 


“It makes kids do really cool stuff,” says kindergartener Jackson.


While the kids have fun integrating technology into their learning experiences, teachers can’t say enough about the positive impact the hands-on projects do for the classroom.


“Most cases in the classroom, we tend to focus on the textbook,” says Angela Sacuik, an elementary school teacher at St. Francis School “By bringing in robotics, we take it to a whole new realm, and it shows kids the possibilities of where their electricity unit could go.”


The video documents how these schools have integrated technology into the classrooms. Released late last year at their respective board meetings, the video came together following this research project including 800 students between Grades 4-12 and 150 teachers.


“The video highlights a small snapshot of the key insights we gained through interviews and surveys with students and teachers,” says Jamey Robertson, Innovation and Creativity Coordinator for the Kenora Catholic District School Board. “I am looking forward to building future partnership networks and creating opportunities for regional knowledge sharing that furthers student achievement.”


Want to watch the video? Check it out here